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Epic drought means water crisis on Oregon-California border

FILE - In this March 2, 2020, file photo, farmer Ben DuVal with his wife, Erika, and their...
FILE - In this March 2, 2020, file photo, farmer Ben DuVal with his wife, Erika, and their daughters, Hannah, third from left, and Helena, fourth from left, stand near a canal for collecting run-off water near their property in Tulelake, Calif. Federal officials announced Wednesday that farmers who rely on a massive irrigation project spanning the Oregon-California border will get 8% of the deliveries they need amid a severe drought. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus, File)(Gillian Flaccus | AP)
Published: Apr. 14, 2021 at 3:39 PM MDT
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PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Federal officials announced Wednesday that farmers who rely on a massive irrigation project spanning the Oregon-California border will get 8% of the deliveries they need amid a severe drought.

The seasonal allocations released by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation are the most dramatic development since water was shut off to hundreds of Klamath Basin irrigators in 2001 in a decades-long battle over water rights in the region.

The Klamath Tribes proactively sued this week to ensure minimum water levels for a fish species critical to their heritage.

The Yurok Tribe downstream from the irrigation project fears salmon won’t survive.

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