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Health and Welfare, Fish and Game, urge caution after chronic wasting disease found in Idaho

The first detection of the disease was seen in mule deer on Nov. 17
Idaho Department of Health and Welfare and Idaho Department of Fish and Game are urging caution...
Idaho Department of Health and Welfare and Idaho Department of Fish and Game are urging caution after Chronic Wasting Disease was discovered in Idaho.(KMVT)
Published: Nov. 23, 2021 at 4:07 PM MST
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Idaho (KMVT/KSVT) — The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game are urging caution after Chronic Wasting Disease was found in Idaho.

The first detection of the disease was seen in mule deer on Nov. 17. In a joint press release, both departments say that while no cases of the disease have been found in humans, they are urging residents to follow certain precautions:

  • Do not shoot, handle, or eat tissue from any animal that appears sick; contact the IDFG if you see or have harvested an animal that appeared sick.
  • During field dressing, use rubber or latex gloves and minimize handling of brain, spinal cord, eyes, or lymph nodes; use equipment solely dedicated for dressing game (avoid using household knives or utensils); and always wash hands and utensils thoroughly after dressing and processing game meat.
  • Bone out the carcass to remove organs most likely to contain prions.
  • Contact any Idaho Fish and Game regional office for CWD testing, especially if you harvested an animal from an area where CWD has been found. Wait for test results before eating the meat.
  • Request your animal be processed individually to avoid mixing its meat with other animals.
  • Avoid eating any tissue harvested from an animal that is positive for CWD.

Chronic Wasting Disease has been found in around half of all states in the U.S. and four provinces in Canada. For more information about hunting guidance and carcass management, contact the IDFG Wildlife health lab at 208-939-9171.

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