Cassia County fourth-graders celebrate Idaho History Day

BURLEY, Idaho (KMVT/KSVT) Hundreds of fourth-graders have a better understanding of the state they call home, after a day learning about Idaho’s history.

Cassia County fourth graders spent the day learning about the history of the gem state.

From mining to ax throwing to churning butter, Cassia County fourth-graders took a step back in time to learn about Idaho’s history.

"We are talking about Idaho wildlife, things that the kids might run into around here, things that they might find interesting," said Ed Hartman from Idaho Fish and Game. "The fact that the first kind permanent settlers were fur trappers and they were primarily trapping beavers."

Students visited different tables and stations, which were all run by volunteers from the Magic Valley.

"We're here doing this demonstration for the kids and the idea that so many children haven't swung a hammer before, we have hammers from 8 pounds to 2 pounds," said Stan Lloyd from the City of Rocks.

This is the 40th year that Cassia County has hosted Idaho History Day. It gives them a hands-on experience with their own backyard.

"Kids don't understand now especially the closest store that they could buy anything was St. Louis, Missouri," said Rick Ramsey, one of the mountain men. "It's hard for a kid to relate to that when McDonald's is right here."

Ramsey says he knows kids always remember what they learned on Idaho History Day.

"A fellow worker came over and he says, 'Oh, what are you doing?', and I said just throwing a little knife and hawk," Ramsey said. "He goes over and picks up the knife and hawk, and I said, 'Go ahead.' He goes out there and I said, 'Have you ever thrown before?' And he says, 'Oh, yeah.' I said, 'Who taught you?' He said, 'You did when I was in the fourth grade.' And he went on about how much he had learned that day."

Every fourth-grader from Cassia County attended Thursday's history day.



 
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