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Hundreds turn out for vigil in Twin Falls City Park

Hundreds of people gathered Tuesday night in the Twin Falls City Park to honor and remember those who have lost their lives to police brutality. (KMVT/KSVT)
Hundreds of people gathered Tuesday night in the Twin Falls City Park to honor and remember those who have lost their lives to police brutality. (KMVT/KSVT)(KMVT)
Published: Jun. 3, 2020 at 4:41 PM MDT
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Hundreds of people gathered Tuesday night in the Twin Falls City Park to honor and remember those who have lost their lives to police brutality.

Winnie Mwende Christensen, the organizer behind the event and founder of Culture For Change Foundation, was left speechless.

"Oh, my goodness," she said. "I don't even have the right words to explain how it was."We live in a small city, and when a ton of us showed up, with the people that are willing to have that conversation and are willing to start to learn, and stand together in solidarity, I don't even know what to say. All I have to say is that it was beautiful. It was a great turnout. I am very proud of our residents."

Speakers at the vigil included Twin Falls Police Chief Craig Kingsbury, speaking up about racial inequality

"There's nothing I can say that will make things OK," Kingsbury said to the crowd. "I also am saddened by the loss of life for Mr. Floyd, Ms. Taylor, and Mr. Arbery, and lots of other people who have unnecessarily lost their lives. So to you, as your police chief, I say I'm sorry.

"I say I will do better," Kingsbury continued. "I will work harder. I love this town, I love this community, and I love the state of Idaho. I'm not going to make any excuses for the bad things that happened in Minneapolis. And make no mistake about it, those four were not acting as police officers — not police officers that I know and love."

Kingsbury ended his remarks saying he is here to talk.

"I'm ready for the conversation," he said. "I realize I'm a white guy. I understand that I have benefited from white privilege all my life. I was raised in this great state. But I try very hard, and now I'm telling you that I'm going to try harder. My line is always open. I am always open to sit down and have a conversation. And even if you're really pissed off, if something really bad happens to you or a loved one, please reach out to me. Let's talk about it."

And Christensen says it's a good place to start.

"This coming from a chief of police is more powerful than him just showing up," Christensen said.

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